Monday, October 23, 2017

More on secession

Reader Maurice Cuffee submitted this:

The U.S. secession movement is alive and well. Texas and California are hotbeds for the movement, although there is evidence that "foreign" influences may fan these flames. Too often the living want to measure history in years or decades, while historians do so in centuries and eras.

What do you think?


More Monday Mish Mash

The Conservative States of America? The increasing desire for autonomy/independence that's playing out in Catalonia as well as in northern parts of Italy leads me to wonder if that could happen in the US. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but all the US Civil War proved was that the side with superior resources defeated the other side and forced them to stay in the union. At some point isn't it possible that people in North and South Dakota will not want to be under the same federal umbrella as California and/or vice versa? NOTHING lasts forever.

Joe Essid, John Crean...please keep commenting. As of today, good comments by readers will no longer be limited to the comments section, but will appear in posts. Maurice Cuffee...please keep commenting. The number of page views for the blog continues to grow, but the number of comments hasn't come close to keeping up.


Image result for Apollo GT

Picture from Wikipedia...an Apollo GT. Here's a picture from howstuffworks.com:

1962-1965 Apollo GT

This car was manufactured in various iterations from 1962 through 1965 with a whopping production total of 90 cars. Besides the look, what appeals to me is that, initially, the car was powered by Buick's small (215 cubic inches or 3.5 liter [sorry, Bill Stephens]) V-8. While that's a REALLY small V-8, I have always been fascinated by small displacement V-8 engines; I'm not really sure why. :)


Saturday, October 21, 2017

Hodgepodge

The game show Jeopardy used to have a "catch all" category called Hodgepodge. Do they still do?

Reader Maurice Cuffee is the first to offer a guess at any of the What Car Is This? cars. For the car shown October 19 he guessed a 1956 Cadillac Coupe de Ville. Given the front grill, it is obvious it is a Cadillac. The car is actually a 1949 Cadillac Series 62 convertible. The year 1949 is significant as the year that GM introduced the first "modern" overhead-valve V-8.


A blurry photo of my Z4 with the top down. Yesterday was ideal top down weather with sunny skies and temperatures around 70°. My wonderful wife has owned several convertibles and I, frankly, never understood the fascination. I do now...

OK, the other What Car Is This? cars so far in October:

October 5: Fred Roth Maverick, a custom car with a fiberglass body over a Cadillac chassis
October 12: Donkervoort D8 GTO

Friday, October 20, 2017

Even a clock that stops

is right twice a day (in the days of old analog clocks). In what appears to be a potentially common sense move by a governmental body, according to a story on Hemmings a study released by the European Commission recommends exempting historic vehicles from car bans in European cities. Many of those cities have restricted or banned cars from entering urban centers and this study recommends exempting historic cars from those bans or restrictions. Of course, they seem to have defined "historic" in a narrow sense, but one can't have everything.

Image result for 1936 Delahaye

From silodrome.com a picture of a 1936 Delahaye Type 135. I think this would qualify as an historic vehicle.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

What Car Is This?

First, this week's initial jobless claims, at 222,000, were the lowest since March of 1973. Despite hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the streak of weeks under 300,000 has reached 137 weeks, the longest since 1970.

OK, an easy one this week:

Image result for 1949 cadillac series 62 convertible

From commons.wikimedia.org. C'mon, people, look at the front of the car!


Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Portofino



From Wikipedia...Portofino, Italy is a beautiful village on the Italian Riviera. Oh, wrong Portofino:

Image result for Ferrari Portofino

From auto.ferrari.com a picture of the California's replacement, the Portofino. The new model doesn't really look that different from its predecessor, if we're being honest, but supposedly a lot of changes have been made that can't readily be seen.

Image result for Ferrari Portofino

Another picture, this one from automobilemag.com.

Ferrari claims that the Portofino chassis is lighter, stiffer and stronger than that of the California. The V-8 is rated at about 40 more HP than the one in the California although torque output is little changed.



From caranddriver.com...it's a beautiful car. For the nth time I will offer my opinion that US car manufacturers are timid when it comes to styling, particularly when compared to some European companies.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

From Mark Twain

"Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself."



Mazda RX-VISION Rotary Sports Car Concept

From mazdausa.com a picture of the RX-VISION rotary engine sports car concept. I wrote about the possible return of rotary engines not long ago and while the auto press thinks that will be in conjunction with a hybrid vehicle, this is something different. What a design!

Sounding like a broken record, I am still hoping (probably in vain) for Ultimate Garage submissions from those of you reading. No one will pass judgment; I am just very curious about what cars are your favorites.

Monday, October 16, 2017

C1

C1 was my section in the second semester of my sophomore year in high school. I think the school modeled its class designations after one of the service academies.

Of course, C1 means first-generation Corvette to most car enthusiasts. Like the C4, the C1 is growing on me, particularly this one:

Image result for 1961 Corvette

(Photo from corvetteblogger.com)

This is a 1961 Corvette. I like it because it has the more modern rear (the "ducktail"), but it retains the chromed cove that allows for a two-tone paint job. The 1962 model did not have the chromed cove and pre-1961 had the older rear that was less attractive, in my opinion.


Maybe a better picture of a '61 Vette. I took this photo from a page in Encyclopedia of American Cars, which is one of my favorite books.

The engine was the 283 cubic-inch V8, but was available in a variety of configurations resulting in various HP/torque figures. The most powerful engine available was the fuel-injected version with a "hot" cam that was rated at 315 HP/295 Lb-Ft of torque. The car didn't weigh much over 3,000 pounds.


Saturday, October 14, 2017

Saturday Surprise

A rare foray into "politics"...

Conservatives/Republicans think tax cuts are the answer for everything.
Liberals/Democrats think government programs are the answer for everything.

BOTH GROUPS ARE WRONG! No paradigm is always appropriate.


Image result for 1962 Buick Skylark

(Photo from bringatrailer.com)

You didn't think I was ignoring the cars altogether...a 1962 Buick Skylark, a car that has appeared here before. I am quite taken.


Friday, October 13, 2017

Beware Friday the 13th

I am not a religious or superstitious person, but a lot of bad things have happened to me on Friday the 13th. Today, unfortunately, is no exception. The worst thing that ever happened was 25+ years ago when the accessory belt on my vehicle snapped, leaving me stranded in the downtown area of a large city. With much effort I arranged a tow to a service station near my office, but on the way a bottle of grape juice on the passenger seat exploded somehow. I never did fully wash out those stains.

On a happier note:

Image result for 1967 Corvette

(Photo from corvsport.com)

A 1967 Corvette. If you forced me to pick a specific C2 Corvette this is probably my choice.